HP Common Printer Errors



These are the most common HP Printer Errors

Error Description
10.xx.yy Supply memory error: either a toner cartridge is defective (bad “memory tag”), or the circuit that reads the memory tag is defective. In color printers, the “yy” portion of the code tells which cartridge has the problem (00 = black; 01 = cyan; 02 = magenta; 03 = yellow). This code only exists on certain models – older printers had no memory tags, and even some of the models with memory tags have no associated error code. Some models also use this code for other cartridge-related problems.
11 Paper out (on early models only; newer models will simply say “Load Tray 1” or “Tray 2 Empty” or something similar, with no numerical error code). If tray has paper, check paper sensor and lift mechanism.
12 Door open (on early models only; newer models will inform you that the door is open, but with no numerical error code). Check fin on door that activates switch or sensor. A few models (e.g., the IIP/IIP+/IIIP) also use this code for other conditions (no toner cartridge, bad fan, etc.).
13.xx.yy Paper jam. The “xx” and “yy” portions of the code may tell you something about the type and location of the jam, but do not rely too heavily on this. More than any other type of error, paper jams require troubleshooting. If the error occurs on power-up (before attempting to print), it is always sensor-related — check for paper in the path, and check all paper sensors and their actuator flags. If the error only occurs during or after a print attempt, it may still be a sensor problem, or it may be mechanical (worn rollers or gears, bad clutches or solenoids, obstructions in the path, etc.). It may be helpful to observe where the paper stops/jams, and whether or not it is crumpled or wrinkled. Failure to pick up paper will also register as a paper jam.
14.x No toner cartridge (on early models only). Check all electrical connections to the cartridge. On some models, there may be one or more tabs on the cartridge that activate switches in the printer. Make sure that these tabs are intact. In the worst case, this could be a bad high voltage power supply or dc controller. On a few newer models (e.g., 2300, 9000), the 14.x error can indicate a feed roller problem in tray x.
15 Not an error code – this code just informs you that the printer is performing an engine test. If it displays this continuously and does not return to “Ready”, the engine test button (usually on the dc controller or engine controller board) may be stuck.
16 Toner low (on early models only). Check all electrical connections to the cartridge. In the worst case, this could be a bad high voltage power supply or dc controller. Of course, it could also be that the toner really is low!
18 MIO not ready (only on older printers with MIO cards). Could be a bad network card, but usually just means that the printer has a network card installed, but is not connected to a network. Verify network connections, or remove card if not using it.
20 Insufficient memory/memory overflow. Simplify the print job or add memory. If this error occurs on an internal test page or a simple print job (such as a page of text), it may indicate a defective formatter board.
21 Page too complex/print overrun. Very similar to the “20” error. Simplify the print job or add memory. If the error occurs on an internal test page or a simple print job (such as a page of text), it may indicate a defective formatter board.
22 I/O error. This can be a problem with any of the ports – serial, parallel, MIO, EIO, or USB. There will usually be verbal information after the error code, telling you which type of port has the problem. Check settings and configurations in the menus, making sure that these match the corresponding settings on the computer/network. Also check I/O connections. If there is bad hardware, it is most likely to be the formatter board.
23 I/O not ready. Rarely seen, but similar to the “18” error. An MIO or EIO card is unable to accept data, either because it is bad, or more likely, because it is not connected to the network.
24 Job memory full. Similar to the “20” and “21” errors. Simplify the print job or add memory. If the error occurs on an internal test page or a simple print job (such as a page of text), it may indicate a defective formatter board.
25 XXX memory full. Similar to the “20” and “21” errors. Simplify the print job or add memory. If the error occurs on an internal test page or a simple print job (such as a page of text), it may indicate a defective formatter board.
30 PS PostScript error, usually followed by additional information. Consult PostScript documentation for more details.
30.1.1 Disk failure (on the 5Si printer only). Press “Select” to continue. If error persists, replace optional hard disk.
30.x.yy Flatbed scanner error (on MFP printers only). Consult MFP documentation for more details.
40 I/O error. Similar to the “22” error (see information under that error code), but more likely to be a bad connection than bad hardware.
41.x 41.1, 41.2, and 41.4 errors (often accompanied by a blank or partially blank page, or random lines on page) usually indicate temporary loss of beam detect (defective laser/scanner or dc controller or bad connections between these – in older models, especially check fiber optic cable), can also be caused by electrical arcing that confuses beam detect circuit (check high voltage and ground connections in toner/ transfer area). 41.3 error indicates incorrect paper size (defective size-sensing board or multi-feed caused by worn separation pad or rollers). 41.5 error (often accompanied by a blank page) is a media feed error – paper reached input sensor(s) at the wrong time (worn rollers or intermittent sensor). In older models (“roman numeral” model numbers), there is no “.x” – all of these errors will appear as a simple “41” error, and troubleshooting is required.
49.xxxx Firmware error (at firmware address “xxxx”). Can be caused by a bad formatter board or anything plugged into this board (firmware DIMM, memory DIMMs, JetDirect card(s), etc.), or by bad data from the computer/network (in this case, a cold reset will clear the error). Can occasionally be caused by other bad hardware (e.g., fuser or ITB belt in the Color LaserJet 4500/4550). Similar to 79.xxxx error.
50.x Fuser error. Check fuser with ohmmeter (a bad heating element will measure open) – if that looks OK, the low voltage power supply is probably bad. Can also be caused by AC line voltage problems. 50.1 on the 8150 most of the time is a bad low voltage power supply.
51.xy Beam detect error (defective laser/scanner or dc controller or bad connections between these – in older models especially check fiber optic cable). In color printers with multiple laser/scanners, “y” indicates which one has the problem (C = cyan, M = magenta, Y = yellow, K = black).
52.xy Scanner motor error (defective laser/scanner or dc controller or bad connections between these). In color printers with multiple laser/scanners, “y” indicates which one has the problem (C = cyan, M = magenta, Y = yellow, K = black). In the 4000/4050/4100 printers, a 52 error with a dim display (no backlighting) can be caused by a defective formatter board.
53.xy.zz In a few older models (2686A/D, IIISi, 4Si), this can be a laser/scanner error, but in most cases, it indicates a problem with the accessory memory (SIMMs or DIMMs in most printers). When present, “x” indicates memory type (0 = ROM, 1 = RAM); “y” indicates memory location (i.e., slot number; 0 = internal); and “zz” indicates the type of error (consult the individual service manuals for more details). Usually, replacing the indicated SIMM or DIMM will clear the error.
54.x On early monochrome printers, this could indicate duplex problems, a stalled main motor, sealing tape still on toner cartridge, or line voltage problems. But it is primarily a catch-all error code for errors that are unique to color printers. There are too many variations to list them all here, but the most common is 54.2, which is a carousel rotation error on color printers with a toner carousel. If there is nothing obstructing carousel rotation, the most likely cause is a bad carousel drive assembly.
55.x The 55 error indicates that the formatter and dc controller boards are not communicating, i.e., one or both boards are bad. Can also be caused by the low voltage power supply (supplying incorrect voltage to the two boards). In the WX engine (5Si/8000/8100/8150), 55.3 or 55.A, usually indicates a fuser/ duplexer problem. Short-term fix: remove the duplexer; long-term fix: replace the fuser.
56.x Accessory error, usually involving attempted illegal use of an input or output device (e.g., trying to feed envelopes while in duplex mode).
57.x Accessory memory error on very early models. Motor or fan error on intermediate models (“x” indicates fan number; 0 = main motor). On later models, 57.x is reserved for fan errors and motor errors have their own code (see 59.xy).
58.x Miscellaneous errors, depending on printer models. Most commonly a cartridge memory error (58.3 on 4100, 58.x on color models), similar to 10.xx.yy, except this one is more likely to be the memory PCA in the printer (rather than the memory tag in the cartridge).
59.xy In the IIISi and 4Si only, the 59 error meant that PostScript was installed without enough additional memory, and the solution was to add memory. On all other printers, this is a motor error. The “x” indicates the type of error, and in printers with more than one motor, which motor. In color printers with separate motors for each color cartridge, “y” indicates which color. This is usually either something binding the motor (e.g., a fuser or toner cartridge that won’t turn) or a bad motor.
60.x In older printers, this could be a memory or formatter error. On newer models, it indicates a problem with the paper-lifting mechanism in tray number x.
61.x In older printers, this could be a memory or formatter error. It is not used in newer models.
62.x Memory, formatter, or firmware error. When “x” is present, it indicates the slot number of the problem SIMM or DIMM.
63.x Memory or formatter error, mostly used in older printers.
64.x Scan buffer error. On most printers, this involves the formatter and/or firmware. On the 4000/4050/4100, it can be a laser/scanner or engine controller board, or bad connections between these.
65 Memory error: defective SIMM/DIMM or formatter.
66.xy.zz External paper-handling device error: x = device number in chain; y = device type (1 = input, 2 = output, 3 = stapler/stacker); zz = error type (see individual service manuals for details).
67.x “Miscellaneous interface hardware error.” On most printers, this translates to a bad formatter board. The exception is the 4V, where this error usually indicates a bad paper guide plate assembly (a fancy name for the Tray 1 pickup assembly).
68.x Permanent storage error. In most cases, this involves NVRAM (where menu settings, page counts, etc. are stored). Try a cold reset (see individual service manuals for details); if the error persists or returns, replace the formatter board. This error can also refer to the hard disk drive if the printer has one. The disk may be defective or just full.
69.x In very early printer models, this was an “optional I/O” error. Newer models with MIO or EIO cards use different codes for this condition. In most printers, 69.x indicates a duplex error – reseat or replace the duplexer.
70,71 Incompatible font cartridge or PostScript cartridge. These errors are only seen on early models.
72 A font cartridge was removed while the printer was attempting to read it. If power cycling does not clear the error, either the cartridge or the formatter board is defective.
79.xxxx Firmware error (at firmware address “xxxx”). Similar to 49.xxxx; see that code for full explanation.
80.xxxx MIO/EIO error. Can be a bad JetDirect card, a bad formatter board, or a bad connection between the two.
8x.yyyy The EIO accessory in slot x (x = 1, 2, or 3) has encountered a critical error as specified by yyyy. Usually caused by a bad EIO card.
86.xxxx EIO slot 1 error, probably a bad EIO card.
87.xxxx EIO slot 2 error, probably a bad EIO card.
89 PostScript ROM failure. The PostScript ROM or SIMM is bad or not plugged in correctly. Only seen on older printers – newer models have PostScript built into the formatter board.
99 Remote firmware update (RFU) failed. Resend the update. Usually only seen in the event log.